I would say I'm a self-taught artist, but that's not totally accurate. More like life-taught.

Which is okay. My artistic expression began to come out a little later in life than it does for most people. Rather than question it, or try to explain it, I decided to go with it. 

I had spent a career in marketing, advertising and PR, crafting messages for corporations, causes, candidates and more. Along the way, I worked with several talented artists, illustrators and photographers on a variety of projects.

In part as a nod to my dad, who was a draftsman by trade and a talented illustrator and cartoonist on the side, I enrolled in a series of drawing classes at a local art institute. Dad had taught me a few principles and techniques when I was younger, so I decided to do something with it. Later that year, I began experimenting with photography. And then, painting. I was hooked.

Edgar Degas said, "Art is not what you see, but what you make others see." I think it's both. Art is personal. I'm fascinated by it. I love to create it. I love to observe what others see in it. And I love to see what others have created.

 

So...it's now part of my journey, a part of my life. On we go.
 

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How it all began

As mentioned above, I began my artistic journey later in life, enrolling in a drawing class at a local art institute. These initial images soon followed. I enjoyed it, but a minor neurological issue in my right arm occasionally caused a slight tremor that made it challenging to add smooth strokes or intricate detail. Nothing serious, but enough to be frustrating, and I eventually put down my pencils and started doing more photography. Painting followed shortly thereafter. I don't know if I'll ever get back to drawing, but I'll always have these images as a reminder of where it all started. For that reason, and because they were done as a tribute to my dad, they mean a lot to me.

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"Shed"

My first sketch, completed for a drawing class.

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"Old Country Path"

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"Fishin' Hole"

Based on the image in "The Andy Griffith Show" closing credits.